7 Key Elements of the Newsweek.com Redesign

newsweek global ipadNewsweek stopped publishing its print magazine at the end of 2012 saying its focus would shift entirely to the weekly Newsweek Global tablet edition. This week, Newsweek offered an introduction to its new online strategy with a beta launch of the redesigned Newsweek.com.

Michael Sebastian of Ad Age explains that Newsweek sees the reimagined Newsweek.com as the first step toward developing a new “long-form, immersive and multi-media experience in the web browser.”

At launch, the redesigned Newsweek.com includes seven key elements:

1. Publishing Schedule

Most websites publish new content continually. Newsweek.com will publish new content (or a new “edition”) just once per week on Wednesdays when three to five stories from the week’s new edition of Newsweek Global will be published on the website. Both the tablet and online editions will publish at the same time. In other words, Newsweek.com simply offers a different way for people to consume the content available in the tablet edition.

2. Design Format

Newsweek.com will be image-heavy and will include images from photojournalists as well as pictures from social media platforms like Instagram.

3. Content Focus

The new site will focus on long-form content for a target audience of people who want to consume more in-depth stories than they’re likely to find on other “quick-hit journalism” sites.

4. Continuity

As a visitor scrolls down the page on Newsweek.com, he’ll find previous weeks’ editions in reverse chronological order, similar to sifting through a stack of magazines.

5. Content Creation

Content will be created by the Newsweek editorial staff, but issues will also include content from writers at The Daily Beast and contributors who don’t work for Newsweek.

6. Price

Newsweek.com is currently free, but fees will come in time once the pricing model has been decided. Subscribers to Newsweek Global will not have to pay an additional fee to access Newsweek.com content.

7. Advertising

At launch, Newsweek.com does not include ads, but they will come in the near future. However, brands will sponsor articles and display “high impact units” rather than sticking to standard banner ads and digital advertising opportunities. Sponsors will rotate each time a visitor views an article.

You can follow the link at the beginning of this article to browse through the new Newsweek.com. What do you think of the redesign?

Image: Newsweek

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